Confronting our privilege: how to get comfortable with feeling uncomfortable

| 7 minute read | Last Sunday, my husband and I were on a Zoom call with friends, and the conversation drifted to how excited we were to be getting our vaccines. Hunja had just gotten his, along with a few others on the call, and the rest of us were feeling hopeful about gettingContinue reading “Confronting our privilege: how to get comfortable with feeling uncomfortable”

PART 2 – Returning to ourselves: how I’m making peace with “me” in motherhood

Becoming a mother is beautiful, thrilling, and deeply fulfilling. It’s also all-consuming, and can bring us to a place where we have trouble remembering who we are. In Part 1, we discussed that two things can be true: becoming a mother forever changes us, AND, at our core, our unique wiring and the passions andContinue reading “PART 2 – Returning to ourselves: how I’m making peace with “me” in motherhood”

Uprooting my own ableism as I parent my autistic son

“Parents need to focus on healing and empowering themselves. They must shift their beliefs about autism. Once the parent knows who they are, the child will respond.” — Lori Shayew A note: I wasn’t sure whether to share this story. I want everything I share about autism to be from a perspective of joy, strength, and empowerment. IContinue reading “Uprooting my own ableism as I parent my autistic son”

Returning to ourselves: how I’m making peace with “me” in motherhood

When I became a mom, I didn’t realize that when I met my first little blessing, I’d also be meeting another completely new person: me. It’s not that I was suddenly unrecognizable, but a gulf now seemed to separate the old me from the new one. That disconnect was jarring. How I spent my time,Continue reading “Returning to ourselves: how I’m making peace with “me” in motherhood”

To beat the pandemic blues, I’m ditching “motivation”

How growing in discipline — gently and graciously — has brought me wellness and joy Do me a favor. In your mind, picture your most grace-filled friend: the one who consoles you when you’ve blown all your new year’s resolutions, normalizes your struggles, and reminds you that your worth is not defined by your accomplishments.Continue reading “To beat the pandemic blues, I’m ditching “motivation””

I’m Learning To Let My Children Grow Into Who God Intended Them To Be

“I learned a long time ago that my children would inherit one of two things: either God’s promises, or my fears.” — Lisa Bevere I don’t consider myself a fearful person. I’m free-spirited, tend to wear my heart on my sleeve, and don’t map out my future with much detail. Enter parenting. Suddenly two people existContinue reading “I’m Learning To Let My Children Grow Into Who God Intended Them To Be”

“Sir, I’m sorry you don’t know me” and other MLK quotes

I took this photo from behind the pastor’s pulpit at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. While interning for the SPLC in Montgomery, AL in 2008, I had the honor of attending this church, where Dr. King began his journey as a pastor and organizer. As a teen, I was enthralled by the history of the CivilContinue reading ““Sir, I’m sorry you don’t know me” and other MLK quotes”

Our default setting: the audacity of white supremacy

The morning after last week’s U.S. Capitol Insurrection, my 6-year-old, Keziah, and I went on a mommy-daughter date to celebrate the end of winter break. We laid out an adorable picnic near a pond, played a game of Candyland, and giggled as the ducks ducked their heads underwater and helped clean one another’s feathers. LastContinue reading “Our default setting: the audacity of white supremacy”